Michael Jackson child sex abuse new lawsuit

New Michael Jackson Child Sex Abuse Lawsuit Claims ‘MJJ’ Brand Companies Seduced Child Victims

Michael Jackson ran a sophisticated operation to procure children for sexual abuse, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. An Australian-born man, who alleges the late singer abused him as a child, shared new details about Jackson’s alleged dark past.

Although Michael Jackson passed away more than seven years ago, sexual abuse claims are still raging on. Just recently, Wade Robson, who has previously been one of the singer’s most dedicated fans, has filed a claim against Jackson’s estate, alleging that the late singer, who died in 2009 aged 50-years-old, sexually abused him as a child.

In his amended claim, Robson argues that Jackson-associated companies, MJJ Productions and MJJ Ventures, had an ulterior motive even though they were established to create and distribute multimedia entertainment made by Michael Jackson.

Robson claims that the “thinly veiled, covert second purpose” of Michael Jackson’s established firms was to operate as a child sexual abuse operation, which included locating, attracting, luring, and seducing the victims.

Robson claims he first met Michael Jackson in Australian at the age of five-years-old, after winning a dance competition organized by MJJ Productions. The award was to meet with Jackson himself as well as join his idol onstage to dance with him.

Even though any Michael Jackson fan would surely be on cloud nine to meet and greet their idol and even perform alongside him onstage, Robson says it was the beginning of a nightmare that adversely affected his mental health and ended his promising career as a dancer and choreographer.

Robson’s lawyers claim that those meet and greets were “purposely orchestrated as a sexual grooming mechanism” to lure minor sexual abuse victims for Michael Jackson, who made headlines as an alleged child sexual abuser numerous times during his life.

Robson first filed the lawsuit accusing the two companies of luring sexual abuse children for Michael Jackson in 2013. But two years later, the lawsuit was rejected because such claims must be made within three years of the death of the defendant. Jackson died on June 25, 2009.

However, the claims against Michael Jackson’s businesses are still proceeding, according to E! Online. The amended claim was lodged by a legal firm that deals with sexual abuse cases, in July this year.

What’s especially astonishing about Robson’s claims is that he once was a dedicated fan of Michael Jackson and testified in courts in 1993 and 2005, claiming that he was not sexually abused by the singer, who was then alive.

In 2005, Michael Jackson was charged with child molestation, with Robson attached to the case as a witness for the defense. However, following his two serious nervous breakdowns in less than a year, Robson underwent a course of insight-oriented psychotherapy, which prompted him to speak up about the late singer sexually abusing him.

The claim states that after the psychotherapy, Robson “gradually came to understand and admit” that he was sexually abused as a child by Michael Jackson and that this experience caused “psychological injury, illness, and damage.”

Robson experienced his first breakdown in April, 2011, two years after Michael Jackson’s death, while the second came in March, 2012. These breakdowns resulted in him turning down “many prestigious and lucrative job offers, such as directing the opening number for the Academy Awards,” the claim reads.

The complaint also states that Robson is no longer able to work as a result of the breakdowns that were caused by Michael Jackson allegedly sexually abusing him as a child. Robson is now said to be associated the entertainment industry with “psychological injury, illness, and damage.”

However, it has since come to light that Robson recently directed a music video for singer Blake McGrath by a post on McGrath’s own Instagram account.

According to Robson, Michael Jackson allegedly began abusing him when he was 7-years-old in California in February, 1990.

[Featured Image by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images]

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