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President Obama’s DNC Speech Sets New Twitter Record For Politics

President Obama Rules Twitter with New Tweets Per Second Record

President Obama managed to receive 52,757 tweets per minute (TPM) during his Democratic National Convention (DNC) speech on Thursday night. That number was enough to become the most TPMs in the history of the social network in regards to politics.

The record was announced by Twitter’s Government & Politics team, which trends political speeches, movements, and other areas of politics to determine the virality of those events. The group noted that the DNC has now received more than 9 million tweets.

To put that number into perspective, Mitt Romney managed just 14,289 tweets per minute while the RNC racked up just 4 million total Twitter mentions.

Even former President Bill Clinton managed to blow Mitt Romney away after his speech ran up 22,000 tweets per minute. In second place on the week? First Lady Michelle Obama brought in 28,003 tweets per minute.

While a new bar has been set, there is a very real chance that record will be broken as Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama begin to square off in political debates leading up to the November election.

In August, Twitter created an “influence index” and as it stands at the moment President Obama has a 52 ranking while GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney scores far worse with an influence of 9.

While the GOP has definitely increased its social media reach since the 2008 Presidential election, the Obama campaign continues to reinvent itself with a Tumblr account and a recent Ask Me Anything event hosted on popular social website Reddit. President Obama brought in a record for Reddit as well as his question segment witnessed 4.4 million pageviews from 1.6 million unique visitors.

With Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Foursquare, Tumblr, and various other accounts dominating the political spectrum, it looks as if President Obama is once again leveraging social media in place of tradition networks.

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