cavaliers t-shirts

‘RWTW’ T-Shirts: Akron And Cleveland Cavs Clothing Sells Out Online

Leave it to LeBron James to post one photo and one video on the “King James” Instagram account, sporting a RWTW logo and seemingly cause the RWTW t-shirts to begin selling out online.

According to the RWTW website, RWTW means “Roll With The Winners;” and, apparently, folks are doing just that by buying the shirts. So much so that the $30 white RWTW t-shirt LeBron sports in the photo and video is listed as sold out at the moment.

The RWTW t-shirts come in colors such as black, white, red, and two shades of grey. As explained by the RWTW website, their motto is all about the strength that is found in numbers.

“Starting a company or punching the clock. Touring the world or holding down your city. The Strength is in The Crew. Welcome to the family. #RWTW…”

However, the RWTW t-shirts aren’t the only t-shirts in town.

lebron james crowd
[Photo by AP Photo/Tony Dejak]
As seen in the above photo, the “All In 216” t-shirts were already a popular staple around Cleveland and Akron prior to the Cavs winning the championship on Sunday. According to Monday’s episode of PTI, a guy was walking around with an Akron t-shirt that had the Cleveland Cavaliers sword on it.

As witnessed by plenty of the Akron-based t-shirt outlets online, basketball fans want people to know that Akron birthed LeBron, while the Cleveland Cavs made him famous.

All because a kid from#akron #ohio, I get to #proudly #wear this #shirt #lebronjames

A photo posted by MochaCowboy (@mochacowboy) on

As reported by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Dick’s Sporting Goods stores remained open late to sell the 2016 NBA Champs Cleveland Cavaliers t-shirts to fans.

The Cavs Team Shop website saw plenty of their t-shirts become sold out.

LeBron, meanwhile, chose a T-shirt that proclaimed James as the “Ultimate Warrior,” as reported by Yahoo Sports‎, when LeBron came home to Cleveland. Seeing as the Cavs beat the Golden State Warriors, and with LeBron calling himself the “Ultimate Warrior,” the publication claimed James was trolling hard against the Warriors.

ICYMI! We won the championship last night!

A photo posted by Fresh Brewed Tees (@freshbrewedtees) on

As reported by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, there are a plethora of Cavs t-shirts that local shops are selling outside of the standard fare. One proclaims, “Two Won Six,” as a play on the 216 area code. One proclaims that the Cavs won a championship before the Cleveland fan died. Others proclaim that the Cleveland Cavaliers earned their win.

The local Fresh Brewed Tees company proclaimed that the so-called Cleveland curse was reversed.

Our site crashed from too much traffic. We are back up and running!! #WIFOhio

A photo posted by Where I'm From (@where_imfrom) on

Some t-shirt sellers reported their websites had crashed from so much traffic and due to an apparently high interest in Cleveland Cavaliers t-shirts after the big win.

Rubber City Clothing has a large selection of customized designs. There’s even an “STV Design,” which shows LeBron’s former high school, St. Vincent-St. Mary High School. Other designs for t-shirts on the website proclaim LeBron’s words about his humble beginnings in Akron.

“Just a kid from Akron, Ohio.”

LeBron shirts
[Photo by AP Photo/Eric Risberg]
The focus of t-shirts is not strictly on the Cavs and their big win. Some t-shirt makers are digging at Steph Curry’s wife, Ayesha, by creating “Bye Ayesha” t-shirts, reports KTVU. The “Bye Ayesha” phrase rhymes with “Bye Felicia,” a popular line from the cult classic movie Friday. The words uttered by Ice Cube have been transformed as a way to say goodbye to Ayesha’s theory that the NBA Finals games have been fixed to favor the Cavs.

Either way, all those worries were set aside as Cleveland Cavaliers fans enjoyed LeBron coming home. With James promising Cleveland a championship win — something that hadn’t been seen in the city for 52 years — folks were overjoyed that LeBron made good on his promise. Fans are showing that joy by buying plenty of Cavs t-shirts.

[Photo by AP Photo/Tony Dejak]

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