Gwen Stefani Explains How Blake Shelton Helped Her Create Misery Song

Gwen Stefani Actually Told Blake Shelton To Put Her Out Of Her Misery [Video]

Gwen Stefani’s song “Misery” isn’t just about her relationship with Blake Shelton; it’s based on an actual conversation she had with her boyfriend of seven months.

In a new behind-the-scenes look at the music video for “Misery,” Gwen Stefani opens up about the inspiration for the song. In the tune with a slightly misleading title, Gwen sings about missing her “boy” so much that it feels like she’s addicted to a drug.

“Put me out of my misery / Hurry up, come see me / Enough, enough of this suffering,” the “Misery” lyrics read.

#Vegas #GoAheadAndBreakMyHeart #ifimhonest @billboard ????????Gx

A photo posted by Gwen Stefani (@gwenstefani) on

According to Gwen Stefani, the idea for “Misery” came to her the day after she and her co-songwriters finished penning another song about her love for Blake Shelton, “Make Me Like You.” In her behind-the-scenes video, Gwen refers to Blake as her “friend” instead of her “boy.”

“I came home [from the studio], and I think I was talking to my friend,” Gwen recounted. “And I said, ‘Put me out of my misery.'”

According to Gwen, she immediately realized that her words would make the perfect refrain for her next song.

In the video above, Gwen Stefani also shows off a few of the many different looks that she rocks in the “Misery” music video. Her least favorite seems to be a black-and-white “plastic bathing suit” that makes a tapping noise whenever she touches it with her acrylic nails. Gwen might love daring fashions, but she just can’t understand why anyone would cover a leotard with plastic ribbons.

Gwen Stefani’s longtime collaborator, Sophie Muller, directed the “Misery” music video. According to Gwen, she was pleasantly surprised that her fans enjoyed the “traditional” music video after seeing her think outside of the box for her previous two, which were both shot in one take. The live music video for “Make Me Like You” that aired during the Grammy Awards features multiple set and costume changes, and the emotional video for “Used to Love You” consists of an up-close shot of a teary-eyed Gwen mentally reliving the breakdown of her marriage to Gavin Rossdale.

“I’m shocked by the response, I have to say,” Stefani told Billboard of the warm reception the “Misery” video received. “It’s such a traditional type of old-school video, I didn’t know if people would be kind of bored with that.”

The video, which Gwen compares to a live-action editorial fashion shoot, was filmed in an abandoned Sears building in Los Angeles and took two days to shoot.

“It was like an art project…like, how many outfits and looks can we do in one day?” Gwen said. “It was just a lot of fun.”

During an interview with 95.5 PLJ’s Race Taylor, Gwen Stefani compared the experience to “playing Barbie.” She also talked about the timeline of some of the songs that she wrote about Blake Shelton, including the duet that they collaborated on together, “Go Ahead and Break My Heart.” Gwen believes that she wrote “Misery” after she penned her half of the duet.

#GoAheadAndBreakMyHeart Gx @blakeshelton

A photo posted by Gwen Stefani (@gwenstefani) on

According to a recent tweet, Gwen is busy rehearsing for her upcoming This Is What the Truth Feels Like Tour with “Let Me Blow Ya Mind” collaborator Eve, which may be why she hasn’t been as active on social media as she usually is. Her fans have started suffering from Snapchat withdrawl, and they really want Gwen to put them out their misery by sharing a photo or video on one of her social media pages. One fan even begged Blake Shelton to quit taking up Gwen Stefani’s free time.

“Please share Gwen… We miss her,” the Shefani fan wrote. Unfortunately for the Gwen-obsessed, Blake replied by tweeting that this isn’t going to happen.

Are you an even bigger fan of “Misery” now that you know that Gwen Stefani wrote it about an actual conversation she had with Blake Shelton?

[Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for iHeartMedia]

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