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Paul Ryan Says Obama Is A Worse President Than Jimmy Carter

Paul Ryan says Obama worse president than Jimmy Carter

Paul Ryan told a group of Ohio supporters that Obama is a worse president than Jimmy Carter Tuesday, the LA Times reports.

At an afternoon rally in a gymnasium in Westlake, a Cleveland suburb, Ryan said Obama is worse than Carter when it comes to unemployment, bankruptcy and a number of other measures. He said:

“When it comes to jobs, President Obama makes the Jimmy Carter years look like good old days. If we fired Jimmy Carter then, why would we rehire Barack Obama now?”

He made a similar comment Monday in North Carolina, saying:

“The president can say a lot of things and he will. But he can’t tell you that you’re better off. Simply put, the Jimmy Carter years look like the good old days compared to where we are right now.”

The Republican vice presidential nominee reminded his Ohio audience that former president Ronald Reagan raised a similar point when he campaigned against Carter in 1980. During a debate on October 28, Reagan told voters:

“Ask yourself, ‘Are you better off now than you were four years ago?… Is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago?”

Ryan also said that Obama is running out of ideas, which is why his campaign “is now sadly base upon the politics of envy and division.” He also criticized Obama for Standard & Poor’s downgrade of the US’s credit rating last year.

In a TV appearance on CBS’s This Morning Tuesday, Ryan also criticized Obama for giving himself an incomplete grade for his first term. He said:

“Four years into a presidency and it’s incomplete? The president is asking people just to be patient with him. The kind of recession we had, we should be bouncing out of it, creating jobs. We’re not creating jobs at near the pace we could.”

What do you think of Paul Ryan’s comments?

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One Response to “Paul Ryan Says Obama Is A Worse President Than Jimmy Carter”

  1. George Kafantaris

    Thirty years ago President Carter authorized a mission to rescue 52 Americans held hostage in Iran. Flying low through the desert, the ill-equipped helicopters chocked up with sand and crashed. President Carter was blamed for this unsuccessful, though daring mission.
    Meanwhile, his successor was praised for cutting a back door deal with the captors to give them banned warplane hardware in exchange for the hostages.
    Moreover, yesterday in Ohio Paul Ryan spoke with derision of President Carter — a distinguished naval officer, a learned southern gentleman, a successful business man, and the beacon of ethics our country turned to after Watergate.
    Mr. Ryan Sir, you have offended us — those who still remember and appreciate the humble decency President Carter had brought to our government.