An Ohio man was given a ticket after he told a cop he lost his pot.

Dennis Wagner, Ohio Man Who Told Cop He Lost His Pot, Had Many Other Run-Ins With Police

“I lost a little bit of my marijuana,” 42-year-old Dennis Wagner told an Alliance, Ohio, police officer, who helped him locate his misplaced marijuana. Police say Dennis Wagner was intoxicated when he asked for help finding his pot, WFMJ News reported.

“Hey. I’m not gonna lie,” Wagner starts telling the police officer, before explaining that he thought he lost his marijuana in the yard somewhere.

The officer maintained his composure and asked Wagner how he knew that he had lost his marijuana. From the audio of the Alliance police officer’s camera footage, it sounds as if the officer holds back a chuckle when he asks Wagner where he thinks the pot might be.

Wagner straightforwardly told the Alliance police officer, “‘Cause I ain’t got it on me.”

Dennis Wagner told the officer that it was somewhere around the yard where he was sitting, but that he didn’t know exactly where it was. Wagner indicated that the marijuana that he had had in his possession was gone. The 42-year-old Ohio man, who appears much older than his early 40s, sounded unsure when the officer asked Dennis Wagner if the marijuana might have fallen out of his pocket. The officer then told Wagner that he wouldn’t want any children to find it, and inquired further about where it might be.

After a quick sweep of the yard, the officer found Wagner’s marijuana and exclaimed, “Here it is, I found it for you!”

Wagner, joined by a cat on a step in front of his house, appeared grateful for the assistance in finding his misplaced pot, but then disappointed when the officer told him that he can’t just throw it back down on the ground for him. Wagner was issued a ticket with a summons to appear in court, according to WKBN News. His arraignment was set for Friday with a charge of drug abuse for “possession or use of a controlled substance.” At court, the arraignment documents showed he would qualify for a public defender, and a Confidential Information Form was also entered into the system, according to a Stark County Criminal Justice Information System Search (CJIS) inquiry.

Wagner’s strange encounter with police after losing his marijuana was far from the first run-in with the local police. His record goes back decades, before Dennis had even turned 21. Besides for a host of traffic offenses, Dennis Wagner was also charged in 1994 with underage drinking and with disorderly conduct in 1995. In 1996, he had to go to court for an OMVI, for driving while intoxicated, court records indicate. He was also charged with “failing to control” in a traffic/criminal offense. In 1998, he had another OMVI, which resulted in the suspension of his licence. Most of his fines were paid off as credits with either community service or attending A.A. meetings.

In 2000, Dennis Wagner was arrested with the charge of assaulting a police officer, but ultimately, Wagner was convicted of resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. He served three days in jail, court records showed.

In 2004, he was found intoxicated again, but he had a knife in his possession. He was convicted of disorderly conduct, and the concealed weapon charge did not stick. In 2008, he was arrested and charged with domestic violence, but was found guilty of only disorderly conduct. The next two years in a row, he was also convicted of disorderly conduct charges for being intoxicated. In 2011, he was arrested for inducing panic and domestic violence, but his charge was reduced to disorderly conduct with persistence. Two years after that, he was found guilty of disorderly conduct again, then also for trespassing and disorderly conduct, but the trespassing charge was dropped. In 2014, Dennis Wagner was convicted of assault. For that offense, he was fined $250 and sentenced to 180 days in jail. All but eight days were suspended on the condition that he would show good behavior for one year.

The internet is cracking up over the video of Dennis Wagner asking an Alliance police officer to help him find his marijuana, but Wagner’s record shows a long history of difficulties involving apparent alcohol dependency and documented run-ins with the law.

[Image via YouTube]

Comments