Hillary Clinton victory

Poll: Clinton And Trump Are Going To Win Big In Connecticut

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are expected to crush their respective opponents when Connecticut voters hit the polls next week, a new survey has said.

According to pollsters at Quinnipiac University, Trump is poised to defeat Ohio Governor John Kasich by a whopping 20 points in the state’s GOP primary. Texas Senator Ted Cruz is set to come in third place, currently polling at just 19 percent.

Donald Trump victory party
Trump is set to post another easy win in Connecticut on Tuesday. [Photo by John Moore/Getty Images]

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is also anticipating a warm reception in Connecticut. She currently leads party rival Bernie Sanders by 11 points, with approximately 6 percent of voters telling researchers they are still undecided.

Quinnipiac University Poll Director Douglas Schwartz claimed Clinton’s sizeable lead over Sanders stemmed from her firm positions on a range of key issues that matter most to voters in Connecticut.

“Secretary Hillary Clinton wins on all the most important issues to voters, except for income inequality,” he said. “Senator Bernie Sanders wins on honesty, values, and empathy. But Clinton wins by bigger margins on leadership, electability, and experience.”

Clinton’s lead in the polls cannot entirely eclipse the fact that Sanders does have a substantial following across the state.

The Vermont senator currently holds a huge 47-point edge over Clinton among voters between the ages of 18 and 34. Sanders is even neck-and-neck with Clinton among white voters. Yet Clinton enjoys an formidable 41-point lead over Sanders among African-American voters. She’s also polling better across the board within female demographics.

Approximately 80 percent of all likely Democratic voters told researchers they had completely made up their minds on who they’d be supporting. Two in 10 voters said they may still change their minds.

Regardless of their preferred candidate, 40 percent of those polled said they would be “very satisfied” with Clinton as the Democratic nominee, while 31 percent added they would be “somewhat satisfied.” By contrast, 35 percent of Democratic voters said they would feel the same way if Sanders won the party ticket in November.

On the flip side, Donald Trump is expected to skate past his opponents in order to secure an easy win in Connecticut when Republicans go to the polls on April 26.

According to researchers at Quinnipiac University, 59 percent of Connecticut Republicans say they’d like to see an outsider run for president rather than a more experienced politician. Among those who would like to see an outsider elected, 75 percent are planning to vote for Trump.

“Connecticut Republicans have gone for outsider candidates such as Linda McMahon and Tom Foley. They continue that trend with Donald Trump,” Schwartz said. “The conventional wisdom that Senator Cruz is too conservative for Connecticut looks true, as he comes in a distant third in the Republican primary.”

Ted Cruz close-up
Ted Cruz has been deemed ‘too conservative’ for Connecticut. [Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images]

Schwartz added that while Kasich is clearly outpacing Cruz in Connecticut, he’s still destined to run “well behind Trump.”

Among Connecticut’s likely Republican voters, 51 percent of men say they’ll be backing Trump. Meanwhile, around 45 percent of women are planning to vote for the real estate mogul. By contrast, 30 percent of women said they would vote for Kasich, with just 20 percent pledging support for Cruz.

Most surprisingly, Trump is substantially outpacing Cruz among Tea Party members and Evangelical Christians. Around 62 percent of Tea Party Republicans plan to back Trump, compared to 24 percent having declared for Cruz. Meanwhile, 37 percent of white Evangelical Christians say they’ll be voting for Trump versus 31 percent for Cruz.

The only major demographic Trump is really tanking in appears to be young people. Kasich currently commands 39 percent of the youth vote, while Trump comes out on top among older voters.

Quinnipiac University conducted Wednesday’s poll by contacting individuals last week via their landlines and cell phones. Researchers quizzed 823 likely Republican voters, and 1,037 likely Democratic voters. Both groups offered a margin of error of around 3 percent.

[Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images]

Comments