A recall of cashews is due to tiny glass pieces.

Recall Of Cashews & Peppers: Emerald Recalls Cashews & Roland Recalls Peppers, Both Due To Tiny Glass Fragments

A recall of cashews has been issued throughout the nation by Emerald. The company specifically is focusing the recall on the packages of 100 Calorie Pack Roasted & Slated Cashew Halves & Pieces due to the possibility of finding tiny glass fragments in the cashew packages, according to Fox News.

Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, Emerald noted that it suspects that the glass fragments originated in raw cashews from a supplier. Only certain production codes are included in the recall of the cashews, and those codes are located on either the carton or insider package adjacent to the panel listing the nutritional facts.

– 15346D346S (best before Dec. 12, 2016)
– 15347D346S (best before Dec. 13, 2016)
– 15352D346S (best before Dec. 18, 2016)
– 15355D346S (best before Dec. 21, 2016)

In addition, the company emphasized that to date, it has received no reports of any injuries, stressing that the recall of cashews was motivated due to “an abundance of caution.”

Cashews are the only nuts involved in a new recall.
Cashews are the only nuts involved in a new recall. [Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images]

However, the FDA in its announcement stressed that any consumers who bought the cashews should avoid eating it. Instead, purchasers can contact Consumer Affairs by calling 503-364-0399 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Pacific Time, Monday through Friday.

In addition to the recall of cashews by Emerald, another company has issued a recall of peppers, reported CNN.

With regard to Emerald, it is among the brands that Snyder’s-Lance manufactures and owns. Snyder’s-Lance revealed that it is continuing its investigation of the origin of those cashews that contained the glass fragments.

“We believe the source of the glass to be the raw cashews received from one of our suppliers under a specific lot code,” clarified the corporation.

The recall of cashews involved seven-pack boxes of 0.62-ounce roasted and salted cashew halves and pieces. Consumers and stores seeking to check if they have the cashews implicated in the recall can check for indicators including the Best If Used By date. The dates of those cashew packages included in the recall had Best If Used By dates of December 12, 13, 18 and 21, 2016.

In addition, those who think they might have purchased those cashews can check the codes. The retail carton UPC is 0 10300 33324 1, while the inner package UPC code is 0 10300 33399 9.

Red peppers also are being recalled.
Red peppers also are being recalled. [Photo by Chaloner Woods/Getty Images]

The separate pepper recall comes from Roland Foods, which is based in New York. That company also has a food recall due to the potential for glass pieces. However, its recall is not related to the recall of cashews.

Roland Foods is recalling fire roasted red pepper strips due to possible pieces of glass. The cans that are being recalled are five pounds eight ounces. The UPC number on those cans of peppers is 041224456280. Distributed nationwide as well as in Canada, the peppers included in the recall also can be detected by looking at the UPC number on the carton, which is 10041224456287.

Roland Foods issued the recall of the fire roasted red pepper strips after a consumer complained. In addition, the company revealed that the recall comes “in cooperation with the manufacturer in Peru.” The statement from Roland Foods noted that it also plans to investigate the origin of the glass fragments.

“The recalling firm has notified the manufacturer of the findings in order to conduct an investigation as to what caused the problem,” stated the company.

Thus far, Roland Foods revealed that it has received no reports of any illnesses associated with the fire roasted red pepper strips. The advice for stores who are selling the items under recall is that they should halt having those foods available on the shelves. Consumers who have purchased the items already and find them at home are advised to either contact the company directly or to take the items under recall back to the store from where they bought them originally.

[Photo by Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images]

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