Hillary-Clinton-emailgate

Hillary Clinton’s ‘Email-Gate’ Problem Is Not Going Away, FBI Chief Is Certain That She Broke The Law

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is already in a great spot to get the party’s nomination by the end of the primary season. The former secretary of state has won in all of the five states in last Tuesday’s primaries.

Currently, Clinton, 68, has earned a total of 1,614 delegates, opposite her rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders’ 856.

Unfortunately, Hillary’s issues regarding her previous email activities and investigation currently being handled by the FBI could become major roadblocks in her campaign.

According to a report by the New York Post, sources say FBI chief James Comey and his investigators are growing more certain that the former first lady has violated laws for allowing classified government information to pass through her secure private email server.

However, some political personnel within the White House are considering a Hillary Clinton presidency as President Barack Obama’s third term. According to agents, these people are expected to block Comey if he files charges against Clinton.

A few of Comey’s agents are reportedly spreading the word through the private sector that the FBI chief is being stonewalled despite evidence proving that the Democratic frontrunner broke the law.

Actually, the FBI could only recommend that the Justice Department file charges against Clinton over the violation. If not granted, the staffers within the federal agency believe that Comey could just quit in protest.

One insider said that one of the indications that the FBI is nearing an indictment is the Clinton staffer who was recently granted immunity from prosecution for providing evidence.

“You don’t start granting people close to Clinton immunity unless you are seriously looking at charges against your target,” said a former official in the report.

Meanwhile, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton said that the FBI could “explode” if the presidential candidate is not indicted for her violations.

“I think that the pressure is definitely building,” Bolton answered when asked whether he thinks Clinton would be indicted.

“And just take the politics out of this for a second. What Hillary Clinton and her top aides did is not just make a few small violations of laws to protect classified information. They made wholesale violations and they did it for a sustained, indeed for a four-year period,” Bolton added.

On the other hand, Hillary Clinton has long dismissed the rumor that she was involved in the relay of classified information within her secure private email server. She also claims that she had no idea that some of the emails she read were classified because they were not labeled as such.

Another issue that Comey and his investigators are looking into is whether Clinton, during her years as Secretary of State, used the computers at the State Department to do work for the Clinton Foundation.

Even if the FBI manages to secure enough evidence that may indict Clinton, the agency will have to go against the Obama administration, who thinks Hillary is the best option for the president’s programs to move forward.

Aside from dealing with the FBI over the private email issue, Clinton also has to settle her problems with the NSA.

In another report, some documents released by the State Department and obtained by Judicial Watch under the Freedom of Information Act revealed a conflict between Hillary Clinton and the federal agency during her years as Secretary of State.

In the documents, Clinton was barred from using her phone, particularly a Blackberry, in her office space at Foggy Bottom because it was considered a Secure Compartment Information Facility (SCIF).

Clinton did not initially comply, and when she asked for the NSA to make a custom Blackberry phone, the agency refused, mainly because Clinton could have used her main workstation to connect to the internet and check her emails.

Hillary Clinton may be winning the primaries for the Democratic Party, but she’s not doing very well at getting federal agencies off her back.

[Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images]

Comments