Posted in: News

Aimee Copeland Refuses Pain Meds, Despite Pain

Aimee Copeland

Aimee Copeland, the Georgia woman who lost a leg, foot, and both hands after contracting a rare flesh-eating disease, is refusing morphine and other pain medications for certain procedures, according to a blog post by her father.

Copeland, 24, contracted necrotizing fasciitis on May 1st, following a zip line accident that cut her calf. Her father, Andy, supervised a bandage change on her substantial wound, an area covering her abdomen and hip that saw skin removal, in order to keep her alive. He wrote in a blog post, according to KVOR, that:

“The area of her wound, which I saw for the first time on Sunday during a dressing change, is massive.”

However, Aimee is reportedly refusing morphine, due to her graduate-school study of holistic pain management techniques. According to the 24-year-old, using pain medication makes her a “traitor to her convictions.” ABC News reports that, when explaining her decision to refuse medications, her father wrote:

“Although that drug effectively blocks most of the pain associated with her condition, it makes her groggy and confused and it gives her unpleasant hallucinatory episodes. Part of her master’s thesis is focused on holistic pain management techniques and Aimee told me that she feels she is a traitor to her convictions when she uses pharmacological pain management. … I know the pain was significant, but Aimee’s courage is greater.”

Less than a month ago, The Daily Mail reports that doctors gave her little chance of surviving the disease, but she became increasingly alert, no longer requiring a breathing tube or dialysis. Her condition at the hospital has been upgraded to serious, a huge improvement for her family. Andy Copeland stated:

“This doctor can’t fathom a reason for why she’s improved the way she has. Her spirits are extraordinarily high. I am absolutely amazed.”

Aimee underwent surgery for a skin graft on Friday, which could be one of many, her father admits. He was hopeful though, stating:

“Aimee’s wound repair is a life-long process that will require ongoing attention and medical care. However, the surgery today will bring her one step closer to her biggest challenge yet: rehab.”

Once the graft takes, Aimee will begin the process of learning to live with prosthetics, according to ABC News.

Articles And Offers From The Web

Comments