Slovenia Flooded With Migrants

Slovenia Flooded With Migrants — Complains About 60,000 Refugees Overwhelming The Tiny Country Of 2 Million

Slovenia’s administration openly lamented about the migrants that have been flooding the tiny European country.

Slovenian Prime Minister Miro Cerar warned that the European Union will “start falling apart” if the latter doesn’t take immediate steps to tackle the migrant crisis almost all of the nations are facing. Speaking openly about the migrants, who have been flooding into Slovenia, he said the following.

“If we do not deliver some immediate and concrete actions on the ground in the next few days and weeks I believe the EU and Europe as a whole will start falling apart. We will not be able to endure this for weeks if we do not get help.”

All the countries in the European Union have witnessed a deluge of migrants. While Slovenia, a rather minuscule country of just two million residents, is now home to more than 60,000 migrants, who just keep on pouring in, Germany had to take in more than half a million migrants within a span of twenty-four hours. Cerar complained that that his country was facing a “very serious” situation. He cautioned that Slovenia won’t be able to cope with the rising migrant crisis for much longer, and steps needed to be taken urgently to tackle the same, before the EU was overwhelmed.

Slovenia Flooded With Migrants
(Photo by Christopher Furlong / Getty Images)

Slovenia’s President Borut Pahor spoke a mere day before a European summit on the migrant crisis was to take place in Brussels. The leaders of EU members Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Romania, and Slovenia were invited to the summit along with two non-members, Macedonia and Serbia, reported ABC News. Incidentally, a draft plan to tackle the migrant crisis submitted by European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker was already being vehemently opposed.

Slovenia appeared to indirectly accuse its neighboring country, Croatia, of pushing migrants onward to Slovenia on their way to other countries in the EU.

“Slovenia cannot become a pocket in which refugees would be stuck if the Austrian and German borders close, because the country could not handle that.”

Meanwhile, the Croatian Prime Minister, Zoran Milanovic, accused the EU’s plans of forcing countries not to “wave” asylum-seekers across their borders without consulting with their neighbors.

“That is impossible. Whoever wrote this does not understand how things work and must have just woken up from a months-long sleep.”

Essentially, the European Union countries, which once welcomed the refugees seemingly with open arms, are now slowly shutting their doors and barricading their borders. Unconfirmed reports suggest Slovenian officials have begun urging the administration to erect a non-porous fence along the country’s border with Croatia. Hungry has already shuttered its once-open border with Serbia, forcing the migrants to Croatia. After Croatia, too, imposed border restrictions, the refugees turned to Slovenia.

Slovenia Flooded With Migrants
(Photo by Sasa Djordjevic / Getty Images)

Driven by rampant violence, over 670,000 migrants have fled Syria Iraq and Afghanistan. These displaced people are flooding into Europe in what could easily be the continent’s worst crisis after World War II, reported Yahoo. Many of the migrants appear to be crossing through Turkey and landing into Greece. Thereafter they move through the Balkans, with an aim to find shelter in Germany.

Since the region was experiencing warm climate, the refugees didn’t seem to hurry. However, the weather is about to get cold. Coupled with the fact that the borders are closing quickly, the migrants have a renewed sense of urgency.

Thousands of migrants have been congregating at multiple locations in the EU. However, the countries appear to be squabbling about who is responsible for them. Many are threatening to seal their borders if the migrant crisis isn’t managed. Slovenia fears if other countries shutter their borders, it would be stuck with the migrants, reported Arkansas Online.

[Photo by Sakis Mitrolidissakis / Getty Images]

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