iPhone 6S 3D Touch

iPhone 6s: The Top Positives Of 3D Touch, 2GB RAM

Now that the Apple iPhone 6s line of phones has officially hit the market, we’re seeing all kinds of different previously unknown positives that go along with the features of the handsets. We heard quite a bit about a number of the new features Apple is bringing to their new iterations, but unless you’re a big time tech-head, you might not truly know exactly how some of these new features work. One of the bigger issues that have popped up since the launch, is just how the 3D Touch is going to work.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 9: Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller speaks about the Touch ID on the new iPhone 6s and 6s Plus during a Special Event at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium September 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. unveiled latest iterations of its smart phone, forecasted to be the 6S and 6S Plus and announced an update to its Apple TV set-top box. (Photo by Stephen Lam/ Getty Images)

What kinds of things can this new feature do? 9to5Mac has helpfully brought us some new information about just what you can do with the most talked about feature of the iPhone 6s and the 6s Plus. The best feature of this function of all is that you can actually “peek” at a number of different applications, such as your email or text messages. This means that if you activate the 3D Touch in your email inbox, you’ll be able to take a quick peek at an email, and then will also have a little drop-down menu asking you what you want to do with this email. This is quite the time saver, especially if you get a bunch of junk emails.

Other applications don’t actually give you a peek, but do allow you to do functions on your iPhone 6s without going all the way into an application. Using the new tech allows you to jot a note down without going through numerous steps that the application forces you to do if you want to do it the old fashioned way. This feature will also allow you to press and hold on the left side of the screen and then slide, and you’ll get to look at the open applications on your iPhone 6s without hitting the home button twice. This might seem like something that isn’t going to save a bunch of time, but it does give another option to those who would prefer to do it that way. At the end of the day, most of the features that come with the 3D Touch are ones that will simply allow you to have more control over how you execute features. That’s never a bad thing.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks speaks about the new iPhone 6s and 6s Plus during a Special Event at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium September 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. unveiled latest iterations of its smart phone, forecasted to be the 6S and 6S Plus and announced an update to its Apple TV set-top box. (Photo by Stephen Lam/ Getty Images)

Another big aspect of the newest models of Apple’s game changing handset line is that the processor in the new iterations is quite a bit faster. The faster processor allows you to open applications quicker, and do what needs to be done that much faster. Paired with that faster processor is the addition of more RAM. Both versions of the newest handsets now come packed with 2GB of RAM. That’s a full doubling of what was being offered in the phones before now. So, what does that extra RAM mean for people who are looking to buy this device? Among other things, MacRumors points out the increased RAM means the new models are able to keep more applications and data active in its memory.

So, what does that actually mean when it comes to using the phone on a day to day basis? It isn’t a huge deal if you’re not someone who has a ton of apps open at one time, or you don’t do a lot of surfing the web. If you do use your phone to run your life, not having to reload a bunch of pages is going to be a pretty nice little feature. That’s really the gist with the Apple iPhone 6s, this isn’t a groundbreaking handset but it’s one with lots of nice touches a true aficionado can appreciate.

[Photos by Stephen Lam / Getty Images]

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