‘Female Viagra’ Is A Thing And It’s Causing A Stir After FDA Signs Off On The ‘Little Pink Pill’

Flibanserin, commonly referred to as female Viagra, will soon be for sale after a decade of testing. Last week, an FDA panel finally gave approval recommendation for the “little pink pill,” the new nickname for the drug. It is named after the men’s drug, Viagra, which is commonly called “the little blue pill.” Like Viagra, Flibanserin is meant to increase the female libido and even heighten satisfaction. Despite the boasted benefits of the drug, many people consider the very mention of the little pink pill, to be sexist.

Originally, female Viagra was created to treat female sexual interest/arousal disorder, or FSIAD. This disorder, similar to male impotency, prevents a woman from being aroused enough to have comfortable sexual intercourse. What makes this product sexist? Well, some believe that the pill is inferior in effectiveness to Viagra, which indicates that scientist don’t consider female arousal and pleasure a necessity. Dr. Peter Weiss of the Women’s Health Center in Beverly Hills, Calfornia has revealed that Filbanserin is not at all the female equivalent to Viagra. He responded to the the idea of “female Viagra,” accordingly.

“A lot of people are trying to claim the pink pill is the equivalent of the blue pill or Viagra for men. And it’s just not.”

Since 1992, when is was revealed that 43 percent of the female population suffers from sexual dysfunction, Flibanserin has been going through trials. The drug is said to increase libido, especially for premenopausal women, according to the Times Gazette. In the trials, 3 percent of women were able to achieve a heightened sexual experience in the trial month. However, all drugs have their side effects and the trials showed that the little pink pill can cause some serious health issues.

During the trials, it was discovered that Flibanserin causes low blood pressure, dizziness, and sometimes fainting spells. FDA experts have made statements about the low effectiveness of the drug. One in particular, Dr. Julia Heiman of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University, has recently made a statement on the ineffectiveness of the so-called female Viagra.

“These are very modest results. But on the other hand, even modest results can make a lot of difference when you’re at a certain point in the clinical problem.”

So, why is the FDA backing it? According to FDA regulations, side effects this severe are okay as long as the warning is clear on the label of the drug. Sprout Pharmaceutical, the creators of the little pink pill, have encouraged the FDA to assist in making the drug more safe.

[Image via AskMen.com]

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