Albert Einstein Font Will Let You Type In His Hand

Albert Einstein was a man of many talents, and over the years his legacy has continued to inspire great minds, as well as the ordinary thinkers of the world. Now, a typographer aims to give everyone the chance to write just as the genius did with a program that mimics his penmanship.

Harald Geisler teamed up with physicist Elizabeth Waterhouse to invent the font, which uses four different designs for each character of the alphabet in order to give it a more realistic look. Geisler says that the fonts available today don’t do that.

“Although typography has progressed from techniques of manufacturing material letters for the printing press in the 15th century to the art of digital lettering, the assortment of handwriting fonts available today do not actually appear like genuine handwriting. If you look closely, the scripted letters are repeated without variation — nothing like the actual art of writing with a pen or pencil,” Geisler said in a release.

The team used a digital pen to recreate Einstein’s writing rhythm, which allows for a beautiful flow that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. The look of the letters actually changes as you type according to the character that comes before and after it. The font will soon be available for PC, Linux, Mac, and iOS at around $15 thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign, which was completely funded recently and still has a month to go.

Geisler has also created a typeface that mimics Sigmund Freud’s handwriting, and both projects have the support of the estates belonging to the icons. As for Geisler, he says he’d love to believe that the new font opens up a world of possibilities for the person who takes on Albert Einstein’s handwriting.

“I like to imagine that when one uses Einstein’s handwriting as a font that a spark of his genius potentially could reflect in one’s own writing,” Geisler said

Albert Einstein made headlines earlier this year when it was revealed that his findings are still being practiced in theory today to help combat such modern issues as cyber hacking. According to the Australian, principles of chronic mechanics have been applied to computer code in order to safely transmit information on the web.

“Quantum physics promises the possibility of absolutely secure information transfer, where personal data sent over the internet could be completely isolated from hackers,” said Professor Geoff Pryde.

[Photo courtesy of Wikipedia]

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