Teana Walsh: Detroit Prosecutor Resigns Over Controversial Facebook Post About Baltimore Protesters

Teana Walsh: Detroit Prosecutor Resigns Over Controversial Facebook Post About Baltimore Protesters

Teana Walsh, an assistant Wayne County prosecutor, recently handed in her resignation over a controversial Facebook post slamming Baltimore protesters.

Freddie Gray’s death while in police custody has sparked outrage, with a number of peaceful protests devolving to violent riots. Apparently, Walsh is absolutely fed up with the cry for justice. She recently offered a solution that she feels would resolve the issues with protesters — shoot them.

According to the Detroit News, Walsh shared a lengthy, controversial Facebook post on April 27.

“So I am watching the news in Baltimore and see large swarms of people throwing bricks etc at police who are fleeing from their assaults… 15 in hospital already. Solution. Simple. Shoot em. Period. End of discussion. I don’t care what causes the protesters to turn violent… what the ‘they did it because’ reason is… no way is this acceptable. Flipping disgusting.”

Of course, the Facebook post immediately sparked outrage, and it didn’t take long for the offensive statement to make headlines. Many of her colleagues have expressed how shocked they were about the comments. Based on Walsh’s level of professionalism in the past, the statement was quite shocking and appalling.

On Friday, May 1, the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office released an official statement announcing Walsh’s voluntary resignation, reports WXYZ.

“During her tenure in the office, Teana Walsh has been known for her great work ethic and her compassion for victims of crime and their families. Her post was up online briefly and she immediately took it down. The post was completely out of character for her and certainly does not reflect the person that we know.”

Although it has been reported that Walsh was not asked to resign, several criminal defense attorneys have stated that Walsh probably made the right decision.

“You cannot be a member of law enforcement and decide you’re going to be judge, jury and executioner,” said Cliff Woodards II, a Southfield criminal defense attorney.

[Image via YouTube Screen Capture]

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