Solar Eclipse, Supermoon, And Spring Equinox: Celestial Bingo Or An Omen?

Solar eclipse coinciding with supermoon and the spring equinox that occurred this Friday has sure become the hottest topic of the week in social media. It aroused sentiments ranging wildly from purely scientific fascination to mystic horror – the latter being strongly fueled by geopolitical events of late and, probably to a greater extent, the ingrained awe of the solar eclipse which dates back to antiquity.

The three celestial events happening on the same day are indeed a rare occasion, and the buzz people gave it clearly demonstrates how ancient cultural beliefs influence their worldview, even though it appears that science reigns in the modern world. According to The Independent, some Christian pastors consider the eclipse alongside the current situation an alarming message.

“Those who advocate the theory that the eclipse and other events are a sign of the end times […] say that recent ominous events also show that something could happen. Global stock markets are volatile and at record highs; there is increasing tension in the Middle East, including in Israel; and votes on same-sex marriage are scheduled for this summer in the U.S.”

Such theories, albeit speculative, have a great impact on many people; they regard the coming of an eclipse, and a total one at that, as an undoubtedly bad sign. However, if the world actually is in turmoil, why throw yourself off balance by giving way to superstitious fear? When not treated as a sinister omen, an eclipse may turn into an exciting, once in a lifetime show – and many people all over the world seem happy to observe it in this way, especially taking into consideration how unique this occurrence is. However, according to the Inquisitr, conditions weren’t very well adjusted for the occasion, at least not everywhere.

“Western Europe was expected to have an excellent view of the eclipse, rivaling the 1999 eclipse that provided quite the show. Children and adults alike drifted from their daily tasks and gathered with special glasses to look up — only to be disappointed by grey, overcast skies that blocked the view.”

However, although the sky was overcast in Paris in London, preventing people from seeing the event in its entire splendor, in some other parts of Europe and world in general (e.g., Norway and Iceland) the nature was more benevolent.

Anyway, the next solar eclipse isn’t due for quite a while: if you’ve missed this one, you’ll have to wait until 2018.

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