By attempting to detect miniature black holes, researchers hope to track gravity's flow.

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider May Discover Parallel Universes In New Experiments

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is set to restart in the coming weeks, following two years of upgrades, and some researchers hope that newly planned experiments may reveal the existence of parallel universes, with vast implications for scientific and philosophical understanding.

Test beams of proton particles were fired last week in the Large Hadron Collider, according to the Birmingham Post, marking the re-ignition of the world’s largest physics experiment. When the collider reaches higher levels of power, which must be gradually built up, scientists are hopeful that new experiments will reveal the presence of dark matter, as well as miniature black holes, according to the Daily Mail. The collider is set to reach 13 tera electron volts (TeV) of power, far higher than the 5.3 TeV previously used at CERN to search for the miniature singularities.

A new model predicts that black holes may form in six dimensions at energy levels of 9.5 TeV and in 10 dimensions at 11.9 TeV. Mir Faizal, one of the scientists behind the upcoming experiment, asserts that these black holes will allow researchers to prove the existence of parallel universes through the theory of “gravity’s rainbow,” according to the Daily Express.

“Just as many parallel sheets of paper, which are two dimensional objects [breadth and length] can exist in a third dimension [height], parallel universes can also exist in higher dimensions,” Faizal explained. “We predict that gravity can leak into extra dimensions, and if it does, then miniature black holes can be produced at the LHC.”

Faizal is quick to point out that the idea of parallel universes is distinct from the “many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics,” which he says falls more into the realm of philosophy than science. Instead, the researchers are using CERN’s Large Hadron Collider to search for evidence of concrete universes in other dimensions.

“We have calculated the energy at which we expect to detect these mini black holes in ‘gravity’s rainbow’. If we do detect mini black holes at this energy, then we will know that both gravity’s rainbow and extra dimensions are correct.”

Two years ago, researchers at CERN were able to use the collider to prove the existence of the Higgs Boson, as the Inquisitr previously reported. If the new experiments are successful, the work conducted at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider may have deep implications for both general relativity and quantum mechanics.

[Image: CERN via the Daily Mail]

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