The Future Of Gaming? This Is Magic Leap

The Future Of Gaming? This Is Magic Leap

Is Magic Leap the future of gaming? Google-backed Magic Leap has been very secretive since its founding in 2010. In October, 2014, with the company still operating under the radar, a conglomerate of companies that included Google threw over half a billion dollars at it (as previously reported in the Inquisitr), causing intense speculation about what they might be working on. The only clue? An augmented-reality app released at Comic-Con in 2011, alongside some extremely minor teasers and leaks.

A month later, Gizmodo broke some amazing news. Digging deep into Magic Leap, they learned that Magic Leap was attempting to seamlessly blend computer graphics and real-life with a heads-up display. Described by Gizmodo as “Google Glass on steroids” this does indeed sound like it could be the future of gaming. But can it live up to the hype?

On March 19, Magic Leap broke their silence in a very big way, with a video intended to be shown at the TED Talks currently taking place in Vancouver, British Colombia. As reported by CNET, the video, titled “Just another day at the office at Magic Leap” starts by showing some basic — albeit fantastic-looking — interaction with Google apps such as Gmail and YouTube. The user then selects a first-person-shooter style game, picks up a toy gun and proceeds to let slip the dogs of war on an invading army of near-realistic robots.

The video description claims that the gamers of Magic Leap are playing this around the office as the articles are being written. See the future of gaming for yourself:

This may be the future of gaming that we’ve been promised (a promise which has thus far failed to deliver) since the early 1990s. Some may even remember trying those early attempts, usually at special events and shows. Almost 25 years later. it’s beginning to look like the future of gaming has arrived at last.

CNET goes on to say that, compared to Microsoft’s competing HoloLens (or Google Glass, for that matter) the graphics are far crisper and smoother; they appear as if they genuinely exist, not as an overlay. This may have something to do with Magic Leap’s fiber-optic technology which allegedly attempts to project images directly into the eye, according to some of their patents. They also hold a patent application for a “tactile glove” which can theoretically interface with objects in the real world.

Is the future of gaming here? It remains to be seen, but things are looking pretty good right now.

[Image courtesy Magic Leap/via YouTube]

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