Electronic Cigarettes Banned For Use In Minneapolis Stores, Offices and Restaurants

The popularity of electronic cigarettes is apparent, with updated news about e-cigs, vaping and terms like “vape” – an electronic cigarettes related word that the Washington Post reported was recently chosen as the Oxford Dictionaries word of the year – happening on a regular basis. However, with the surge in interest in electronic cigarettes – which are popular apparatuses that vaporize nicotine – comes additional concerns about the safety of those electronic cigarettes.

As reported by the Inquisitr, recent controversy erupted about electronic cigarettes potentially containing 10 times the amount of carcinogens that can cause cancer than the levels found within regular, non-liquid and tobacco-based cigarettes. As a result, on Friday, the Minneapolis City Council passed new rules that banned the use of electronic cigarettes within indoor public places – such as eateries, schools and offices – says the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

In fact, the state of Minnesota additionally created a law that disallowed vaping close to schools, hospitals and public university campuses – all in an effort to protect the public from any dangerous vapors released during the process.

Despite all of the negative (and positive) buzz surrounding electronic cigarettes, the Los Angeles Times proclaimed that e-cigs are here to stay, noting firms like the California Vaping Company and others who are profiting from the surge in the estimated $4 billion electronic cigarettes industry. At the same time sales of electronic cigarettes are surging, tobacco cigarette sales have decreased – a phenomena that has caused experts to predict that by the time the year 2024 arrives, there will be more people vaping electronic cigarettes than smokers smoking.

Part of the reason fans of electronic cigarettes prefer them to traditional cigarettes is because the electronic versions purportedly don’t contain harsh chemicals, tars, or the same substances that are burned and leave bad smells in the hair and clothing of those who smoke tobacco cigarettes.

It isn’t merely the United States that’s learning to deal with the ramifications of e-cigs. As reported by BBC News, there are concerns about children trying electronic cigarettes because they are presumed safer than others – while on the other side of the coin, the Guardian reports that e-cigarettes could save approximately 500,000 lives of folks in the U.K. who switch from traditional smokes to their electronic versions. Attribute those factors to the reasons why successful electronic cigarette guides are popping up online and answering questions from the general public and those wanting to know everything about e-cigarette safety, side effects, and more.

[Electronic Cigarettes Image Credit: ShutterStock]