RICO Act lawsuit

Dallas Dad Uses RICO Act To Sue Lacrosse Coaches Over Playing Time Dispute

A Dallas dad is using the RICO Act to sue his son’s lacrosse coaches over playing time dispute. The RICO Act (Racketeer influenced and Corrupt Organizations) is the statute law enforcement officers have often used to put mobsters behind bars. Congress passed the law in 1975.

Bill Munck, is both the father of an Episcopal School of Dallas lacrosse player and an attorney. Munck claims that coaches at the school and the Dallas Lacrosse Academy “conspired to coerce” parents into paying thousands of dollars to make sure their sons would get playing time.

An excerpt from the Dallas lacrosse lawsuit reads:

“Through the use of illegal and fraudulent conduct, including threats, intimidation and even extortion, defendants have tried to ensure that student athletes who want to play lacrosse in North Texas have to pay for play and have to go through the defendants’ enterprise.”

Munck’s lawsuit also claims that school instructors and coaches at the for-profit academy told lacrosse parents that their sons would not be granted any playing time unless they forked over some extra cash for enhanced training and private camps.

Billy Munck, the attorney’s son, reportedly played in nine of the 11 games during the most recent season but he did not letter in the spot and ultimately left the school. The lawsuit filed against the school also claims that lacrosse coaches violated NCAA rules.

The legal filing goes on to allege that some of the “better players” were asked to replace weaker players that were already on the roster by playing under their names at recruiting tournaments. If the claims are accurate, the players, presumably with parental permission, boarded airplane and stayed at hotels under the assumed names as well.

Legal experts not associated with the case but asked for their opinion have expressed doubts that the Dallas lacrosse lawsuit will proceed with the RICO charges attached. The attorneys polled stated that a “long pattern and specific evidence of racketeering” must be present for such charges to hold water. The lawsuit is 39-pages long. Bill Munck has admitted to spending thousands of dollars to help ensure his son’s playing time. “Through the use of illegal and fraudulent conduct, including threats, intimidation and even extortion, defendants have tried to ensure that student athletes who want to play lacrosse in North Texas have to pay for play and go through the defendant,” the lawsuit added.

What do you think about the Dallas lacrosse lawsuit?

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