McDonald’s Employee Tips: Eat Less, Spend Less, And Stop Complaining

Todd Rigney

Leaked McDonald’s employee tips have taken the internet by storm.

In order to provide their workers with helpful information that could theoretically improve their daily lives, the fast food behemoth posts all sorts of hints and tips over at McResource Line. However, don’t bother clicking that link; unless you’re currently employed by the company, you can’t gain access. Sorry to get your hopes up.

However, Low Pay Is Not OK managed to snag a few screencaps featuring some of McDonald’s employee tips. Although the company claims this advice was entirely taken out of context, this hasn’t stopped folks from getting a little bent out of shape about the fast food chain’s ideas for a better existence.

Included among the company’s plethora of helpful hints and tips are such suggestions as eat less (“Breaking food into pieces often results in eating less and still feeling full”), complain less (“Stress hormone levels rise by 15% after ten minutes of complaining”), and sing more (“Singing along to your favorite songs can lower your blood pressure”).

The McDonald’s employee tips also included some pointers about how workers can scrape together a little scratch during the holiday season. Instead of bugging your boss about a raise, simply sell your unneeded possessions online.

“You may also want to consider returning some of your unopened purchases that may not seem appealing as they did. Selling some of your unwanted possessions on eBay or Craigslist could bring in some quick cash,” the company suggested to their staff.

According to NBC News, McDonald’s claims Low Pay Is Not OK is attempting to smear the chain’s name by releasing the tips. In the company’s opinion, the hints provided to workers are simply there to help them become better, more productive people.

A representative for the chain explained:

“This is an attempt by an outside organization to undermine a well-intended employee assistance resource website by taking isolated portions out of context. The McResource website has helped countless employees by providing them with a variety of information and resources on topics ranging from health and wellness to stress and financial management. The website also includes some rotating “quick tips” and while we recognize that some of these could be taken out of context, the vast majority of the resources and information on the site are based on credible outside experts and well-published advice.”

This certainly isn’t the first time McDonald’s has come under fire for the hints they’ve given to workers. The Inquisitr reported that the company’s previous suggestions included signing up for food stamps and Medicaid. The chain denied these allegations as well.

Are you surprised by the McDonald’s employee tips?

[Image via Creative Commons by Robert Magina]